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Pulse EP Review Efe Ejeba suffers from a poverty of talent on "Lagos" EP

This is a poor body of work, capturing not just his earlier financial poverty, but also a poverty of skill.

  • Published: , Refreshed:

Extended Play - Lagps
Artiste - Efe
Record Label - Matrix Music Nation (2016)

Duration- 36 minutes

Nobody wants to listen to this. Nobody deserves to listen to Efe Ejeba. But some people will, and that’s because he is Nigeria’s latest reality TV star. The Jos rapper is the most popular man in Nigeria right now after emerging the winner at the 2017 edition of the Big Brother Naija.

An upcoming rapper, Efe has always been about the struggle, and the quest to make money in life. His inclusion in the show and his conduct in the house may have endeared everyone to his ‘real’ personality, but will they still feel that way after listening to Lagos EP? Not certainly.

The full gist of the EP is Efe’s journey to Lagos, in search of hope and a chance to make it in the bright lights of the entertainment scene. Produced mixed, and mastered by Duktor Sett, “Lagos EP” is rather robust with its 14-tracks.

 

The EP embraces the theme of lack and poverty from the first sentence. “I need money to go to the studio, to mix my song, the song I want to promote. I need money to take my picture shots. And I need money to buy at least one or two t-shirts that I will be using for the picture shots.”

Poverty has friends, most of them crude and uncultured. And you could feel it across the entire project. ‘Sowey’ is a lesson in mundane living, while the skit is not cohesive, painfully bearing at attempt comedy, and a corny motivational speech, which does more to irritate the ears, rather than entertain. But he manages to still document his lack on the project. The talking drums on title track ‘Lagos’ can offer you something to hold on, only if you can filter out the poor mixing and disruptive adlibs.

There’s more dirt and trash talking on ‘Call Olokpa’, and ‘Bad belle’, which is in contrast to the thanksgiving on ‘Outroduction’, and the prayers on ‘Thank God’.

Efe play

Efe

(twitter)

 

In the midst of this poverty pornography, there’s space for love, which he explores on mindless Afropop of ‘Sikira’, the Highlife on ‘Ukwu’, and the sing-rap of ‘Wahala dey’.   Choosing the most simple of beats to create deft and nimble flows, he finds new ways to be vocally crude. Faulty mixing and poor songwriting ensures that the concepts are at most half-baked, and everything descends into a miasma of sounds.

Efe might have the ear and eyes of the public, but if he wants to maintain it, he should never direct them towards this project. Fans are fickle, and it takes less than a body of horrible music to make their opinions sway. This is a poor body of work, capturing not just his earlier financial poverty, but also a poverty of skill.

But things are looking up right now for him, and as the money and help pour in, there’s also the chance for the singer to invest in his music, and improve on this EP. It’s a disaster to listen to this; a gritty exercise, with no silver lining. Let’s see what N25 million can do.

Rating 1/5.

Ratings Board

1-Dull
2-Boring
2.5-Average
3-Worth Checking Out
3.5-Hot
4-Smoking Hot
4.5-Amazing
5-Perfection

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