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Trump The White House: Five takeaways from Sunday

President Donald Trump fired off tweets to settle scores from his Mar-a-Lago residence in Florida, defending his tough stance on illegal immigrants, taunting judges and praising an advisor.

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US President Donald Trump walks away from Marine One at the White House as he returns from his weekend trip to Mar-a-Lago play

US President Donald Trump walks away from Marine One at the White House as he returns from his weekend trip to Mar-a-Lago

(AFP)

President Donald Trump fired off tweets to settle scores from his Mar-a-Lago residence in Florida, defending his tough stance on illegal immigrants, taunting judges and praising an advisor.

Tough on the undocumented

Trump patted himself on the back for a series of raids this week that nabbed hundreds of undocumented migrants, attributing the success to his tough stance toward undocumented immigrants who have had run-ins with the law.

"The crackdown on illegal criminals is merely the keeping of my campaign promise. Gang members, drug dealers & others are being removed!" he tweeted.

New executive order?

The White House confirmed Sunday that Trump is weighing a new executive order on immigration, defying federal court rulings that struck down his ban on refugees and other travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Senior advisor Stephen Miller accused the judges of taking for themselves power that belongs "squarely in the hands" of the president.

On Twitter Trump accused the courts of having a "BREAKDOWN" that is allowing people from the targeted countries to rush into the United States.

Advisor getting his closeup

The pugnacious and highly combative Miller, 31, made the rounds of the Sunday television talk shows, piquing the media's interest and earning praise from his boss.

"Congratulations Stephen Miller- on representing me this morning on the various Sunday morning shows. Great job!" Trump tweeted.

Protests in Mexico

Tens of thousands of Mexicans protested against Trump, hitting back at his anti-Mexican rhetoric and his pledges to make their country pay for his "big, beautiful" border wall.

In what looked set to be Mexico's biggest anti-Trump protest yet, some 20 cities joined the call to march made by a group of dozens of universities, business associations and civic organizations.

There were 20,000 demonstrators in Mexico City, according to local authorities. Marches in Guadalajara, Monterrey and Morelia also drew thousands of people -- though a planned protest in the border city of Tijuana fell flat.

"Mexico must be respected, Mr Trump," said a giant banner carried by protesters in Mexico City, who waved a sea of red, white and green Mexican flags as they marched down the capital's main avenue under the watchful eyes of thousands of police.

Anti-Trump show at Fashion Week

Fashion Week's determination to subvert the Trump presidency put "Make America New York" hats on the runway at Public School.

The red hats symbolized the New York identity of uber hip label Public School -- founded by hometown team Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne -- and the values of America's cultural capital, a gateway to immigrants for centuries.

Emblazoned with white letters, the caps were a blatant riff on the "Make America Great Again" hats from the Trump campaign and the slogan that has remained the president's rallying cry in office.

The numbers "44 1/2" were printed on the side, hard not to interpret as another dig at Trump, the 45th president who could be seen as "half" a president after losing the popular vote to Hillary Clinton.

Public School took the political commentary further by dubbing their show "You're Welcome" -- in contrast to the Trump administration's protectionist, anti-undocumented immigrant stance.

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