Anyone with a Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Whatsapp, or a combination of these media applications must have surely quite a lot of PDA happen on them.

Boyfriends proudly announce on Twitter that their girls are the most beautiful beings on God's green earth; on Instagram, wives post pictures of expensive gifts gotten for them by doting husbands, kisses, cute captions, love-eyed emojis, intimate selfies, etc litter everywhere, from celebrity timelines to no

The list is quite endless, confirming that on the Internet is actually where most of the real PDA happens. In all likelihood, everyone has one or two of those friends or followers who seem to enjoy social media PDA a bit more than everyone else, with at least 80% of their pictures, posts and stories being centered around their S.O [significant other.]

If they are not posting a picture about the last date they went on, they'll have a story to share about the breakfast brought to them in bed by their boo. This is not to say this isn't beautiful - it's actually amazing and couples who do this need to keep it up.

On the flip-side, there are couples on these social media platforms who do not engage in PDA or rarely do it.

Because there is often an urge in lovers, to feel adored, loved, pampered, boasted about and shown off, it is not uncommon for partners to sometimes feel the need to be gushed about on social media, to have their bae/boo announce an undying, endless beautiful love for them on these platforms. They want these performative things as a form of validation. They see [wrongly] them as some kind of necessary modern-day relationship assurance.

ALSO READ: Simi, Adekunle Gold: Private relationship goals?

This could actually lead to arguments and resentment in some cases because the reluctance to show off your sweetheart on social media could be interpreted as a sign that you're hiding the relationship from either a side-chick or a side-guy. It could also be [mis]taken as a sign that you are not proud to have your partner in your life.

So, one has to ask; exactly how important is social media PDA, what does it say about a relationship, and what's its relevance on the bond partners share?

It is undeniable that social media and our way of life are now so connected that it may be difficult to keep every aspect of your relationship life off ALL social media platforms. However, sweet social media interaction between couples does not mean all is well, and a lack of it does not necessarily threaten the happiness and longevity of the relationship.

As actress, Omotola Jalade-Ekeinde said in an exclusive interview with Pulse:

“I know that this generation and this time we’re in is very difficult to not want to put everything out there… But I think you need to work on yourself. You know, if you have to struggle to hold yourself from putting something out there, there’s nothing wrong with you actually."

Internet loving might be cool and desirable; but just as all other forms of PDA, it is not as important as what you do together, how you relate and what your relationship feels like when it's just two of you, with no one to impress.

In essence, social media love might look all glossy like an HD picture on a magazine cover, but a lack of it is not always detrimental to your relationship.

Matter of fact, keeping your business off social media might be just the thing to help you stay happy as a couple, rather than appearing happy as a couple.