Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Abubakar Malami, has been hobnobbing with famous fugitive Abdulrasheed Maina. For that singular reason, his position should no longer be tenable.

According to latest revelations from the Maina hearing, President Buhari’s chief law officer flew all the way to Dubai to plead with Maina to return; and then facilitated Maina’s reinstatement into the federal civil service.

Before television cameras and a battery of newsmen, Malami couldn’t deny outright that he committed the act of reinstating Maina who was dismissed from the government’s payroll in 2013 for allegedly defrauding pensioners of billions of naira through the pension reforms task force.

There are several pieces of the jigsaw sufficient enough to arrive at the conclusion that Malami it was who penned the letters to the civil service commission and the interior ministry; demanding that Maina be reinstated.

The man hasn’t denied the allegations. Instead, he’s deployed evasive tactics and confusing legal speak to explain why he ferried someone who is running away from the law back into the civil service.

President Buharihimself has been accused by Maina's family of knowing that the fugitive was going to be reinstated into the civil service. In which case we should also ask the president to tell us all he knows about the Maina reinstatement. Everything.

Malami has emerged from this whole Maina saga reeking of excrement. The country’s chief law officer can’t be flip-flopping on a matter this grave and be allowed to get away with it.

It is often said of Buhari that he takes his time to make up his mind. Malami is probably on the next ‘hit list’ of public officials to be fired by the president. There are speculations that he’d be shown the exit door at the next cabinet reshuffle.

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We’d urge Malami to resign before he’s fired. When your integrity has been called to question on the job in a manner this deprecating, it’s always advisable to fall on your own sword or bite the bullet by throwing in the towel.

For God and country.