A Lagos lawmaker, Mr Tunde Braimoh, has appealed to governors in the South-West to be more practical about security issues in order to return the region to Nigeria’s safe haven.

Braimoh, representing (APC-Kosofe II) in the Lagos State House of Assembly, made the plea on Monday in Lagos.

According to him, the region and by extension, the nation, should be proactive and resist the primordial sentiments being orchestrated and articulated by some political capitalists that the bandits are Fulani herders.

“It’s most astonishing and disheartening to watch our dearest South-West hitherto prided as Nigeria’s safe haven sliding into a pitiable and miserable habitat smirking of primitivism and barbarism where life is brutish, short and nasty.

“The unsavory development is reported to be perennially recurrent, but is highlighted only when the nobility is hurt.

“All lives are important and regardless of their circumstances of birth or station in life.

“All Nigerians deserve a guarantee of their lives and property in exchange for the individual sovereignty they submitted to the governments.

“It’s high-time our governors in the South-West did something concise and precise, not only in response, but in proactively against this revolving, all-pervading menace,” Braimoh, also a lawyer said.

The lawmaker described the Vice President Yemi Osinbajo’s promise to deploy troops to the highways in the region as laudable.

He, however, said that such step might be the beginning of another round of problems, if not properly directed and over-sighted.

According to him, the place of intelligence and empirical precision cannot be overemphasised in this security challenge.

Braimoh said: “These criminals are not ghosts, and they didn’t dramatically descend from heaven. They live within us in Nigeria and rise up within our ranks to afflict untold injuries on us.

“If the Federal Government believes our claims are exaggerated, can’t the governors, at least, supply verifiable statistical data to back up our claims?

“We must resist the primordial sentiments being orchestrated and articulated by some political capitalists that the bandits are Fulani herders.

“A criminal is a criminal, no matter the race or religion, creed or colour. Will a Yoruba man be justified for committing those heinous crimes? The answer is no!

“Therefore, it will not matter who does what, so long as that thing is wrong,” Braimoh said.

According to him, a section of the country of such morbid crime flagrantly without empiricism will only divert attention from the crime to our original fundamental ethno-religious problems which will only exacerbate the already precarious position.

“A stitch in time saves several, and that the time to rise and act is now,’’ he said.

Braimoh said this brigandage was aliened to us, and should be given no place to even hibernate.