• California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal-OSHA) opened two new inspections in September into the workplace conditions at
  • According to the agency, the first was opened on September 4 and was prompted by an incident reported to regulators in which a contract worker became stuck between two garbage bins after a forklift pushed one of the bins.
  • The second was opened on September 5 and came after an incident reported to the agency in which a contract worker's fingers were caught in a torque gun, according to Cal-OSHA.
  • Tesla
  • "Tesla takes safety extremely seriously and is constantly identifying safety improvements across our global operations to help us become one of the safest places to work," a Tesla spokesperson said.

California's Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal-OSHA) has opened two new inspections in September into the workplace conditions at Tesla's factory in Fremont.

The first was opened on September 4 and was prompted by an incident reported to the agency in which a contract worker became stuck between two garbage bins after a forklift pushed one of the bins. The incident was reported to regulators on August 30, but the agency did not say when the incident occurred.

The second was opened on September 5 and came after an incident reported to the agency in which a contract worker's fingers were caught in a torque gun. According to the agency, the incident occurred on August 24 and was reported to regulators on August 31.

There are currently six open inspections into Tesla's Fremont factory and one into its store in Rocklin. Inspections do not necessarily lead to financial penalties or findings of wrongdoing.

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In August, Cal/OSHA proposed $1,000 of fines following an inspection opened in April. The agency proposed a $400 fine due to Tesla's failure to report a worker's injury from February within seven days and a $600 fine for failing to clear extension cords from the factory floor. A Tesla spokesperson told Business Insider that the company is appealing the $400 fine because it says the injury in question was reported correctly. The spokesperson added that Tesla has implemented a new system for tracking safety incidents.

In a September 7 email to employees that was posted to the company's website, CEO Elon Musk announced that Laurie Shelby, the company's vice president of environmental, health, and safety, would report directly to him and said worker safety is a priority.

"Your safety and just generally making sure that you love coming to work is extremely important, which is why [Shelby] will report directly to me. We are working hardcore on having the safest (and most fun) work environment in the automotive industry by far," he said.

Concerns about workplace safety have been a point of controversy for Tesla. In February, a post on Tesla's website written by Shelby outlined steps

But an April report from The Center for Investigative Reporting said misreported workplace injuries,