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Pulse Opinion We all want to be like Dele Alli, stop hating on him

The cold shoulder given to Dele Alli is just based on unreasonable sentiments and fake patriotism.

  • Published: , Refreshed:
Dele Alli the Nigerian British footballer play

Dele Alli might be a star at home but in his native Nigeria, he has few fans

(Sky News)

Much to the annoyance of football lovers and analysts, the Three Lions of England are in the semi-finals of the World Cup in Russia.

This World Cup has been unpredictable, to say the least. Heavy contenders such as Spain, Argentina, Brazil and Germany have been kicked out by teams with lesser pedigree. While the football world has embraced these upsets and described it as the beauty of football, England hasn't been embraced.

You can blame the annoying British press or the British fans for the almost universal hate of the Three Lions. No one wants to see Harry Kane and his teammates lift the World Cup.

England coach Gareth Southgate and captain Harry Kane celebrate their World Cup quarter-final victory against Sweden play

England coach Gareth Southgate and captain Harry Kane celebrate their World Cup quarter-final victory against Sweden

(AFP)

 

You would think that Nigerians this time would love to see the World Cup trophy go back home especially because a Nigerian might just have the chance to win it.

Dele Alli is two games away from having the gold medal slung across his neck. While British fans are going berserk in their support for Dele and the lads, Nigerians back home could care less about the British player of Nigerian descent.

Dele Alli scores the second goal for England as they beat Sweden to reach the World Cup semi-finals play

Dele Alli scores the second goal for England as they beat Sweden to reach the World Cup semi-finals

(AFP)

 

Dele Alli is the son of a wealthy Nigerian and a British mum. As a young boy, Dele spent some time in Nigeria. He would later leave for England and stay with his mum. It's in the Queen's country that he would develop his talent for football and go to have not the best of relationships with his parents.

Dele Alli and his father Kehinde play

Dele Alli and his father Kehinde

(Sunday Mirror)

 

From the modest Milton Keyes team, Bamidele Alli talent brought him to Tottenham Hotspurs- a swashbuckling team known for its attractive attacking football. Harry Kane might get most of the plaudits for being a goal machine but Dele Alli has also been constantly in the spotlight for banging in goals when it matters most.

Some might doubt his level of skill but one thing you can't take away from him is his ability to be at the right place at the right time just like his goal against Sweden.

Dele Alli might be a member of the less flashy, silver generation of British football that has a shot at winning the World Cup but back home in his native Nigeria, his other countrymen could care less.

ALSO READ: Ndidi wants England to win

Naija spirit doesn't take too kindly to a son of the soil playing for England. As Nigerians, we believe you should identify with the country through and through. John Boyega, Skepta, Wale, Jidenna, get a thumbs up for displaying their Naija swag. Dele Alli doesn't get this type of accolade.

 

His sin is choosing not to play for the Super Eagles. His decision is made much worse with the likes of Leon Balogun, William Troost-Ekong deciding to play for Nigeria.

We want to be like Dele Alli, stop hating on him play

The Super Eagles 'Oyinbo Wall' Leon Balogun, William Troost-Ekong. Two Super Eagles players with dual citizenships that decided to play for Nigeria

(Own Goal Nigeria)

 

Nigerians might just be doing too much concerning Dele Alli. If we were in his shoes, we would do the same thing. An average Nigerian dreams about living the country and settling down in another country where the grass is a whole lot more greener.

 

We joke about leaving Nigeria at the drop of a hat if we win the US visa lottery but we are dead serious about it. The reason why many of us haven't left is that we don't have the resources to do so.

Go to most of the European and North American embassies and you will see hundreds of Nigerians eager to leave this country. The likes of John Boyega, Wale and Jidenna are children of Nigerians who decided to leave the country for greener pastures in the 80s and 90s. A worthy investment for their children if you ask me.

We want to be like Dele Alli, stop hating on him play

Jidenna's father Oliver Mobisson moved his family to America in the 90s

(Rolling Stone )

ALSO READ: Can England dream of World Cup glory?

All the key statistics regarding Nigeria don't point to a country where basic things work. Poverty is at its highest. The uninterrupted power supply is still a myth. Law and order don't exist. Justice belongs to the highest bidder. Many of us want to get out and live betters. We also want our children to live quality lives and have a good education.

Let's be honest. If you were presented with a green passport or a burgundy passport, chances are you would choose the latter. Let's not kid ourselves, Nigeria is not the place where your talent can grow to its fullest potential.

You might not be fond of Dele Alli because he hasn't a Naija moment yet but disliking him because he chose to play for England over Nigeria is overdoing it. If we were in his customized Nike boots we would leave Nigeria for a better country.

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