Police clash with Salaga students, one shot dead

One student has been shot dead in a clash between the police and students of T. I Ahmadiyya Senior High School

 

A student has reportedly been shot dead in a riot at Salaga in the Northern region after police fired warning shots and tear gas into students.

This follows a clash between students of T. I Ahmadiyya Senior High School in Salaga and the District Police in the area when three students were arrested for attacking the headmaster of school.

Report indicates that the students were sanctioned by the Headmaster for misconduct for wearing slippers to the examination hall and allegedly assaulted the headmaster in the process.

Their colleague students were incensed and subsequently vandalized police properties and burnt one of the school’s dormitories.

The students outnumbered the police compelling the latter to resort to indiscriminate firing of warning shots in an attempt to disperse the unyielding crowd.

Chief Inspector Yakubu of the Salaga District Police Station has disclosed that his outfit has called for reinforcement from the Northern Regional Police Command in Tamale to quell the situation.

The students also vandalized a police vehicle in the process.

Some students sustained various degrees of injuries and are currently receiving treatment at the Salaga Government Hospital.

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