Zamfara governor, Bello Matawalle, has insisted that the defunct Special Anti-Robbery Suqad (SARS) of the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) is an important component of the state's fight against banditry.

The Inspector-General of Police, Mohammed Adamu, dissolved the unit almost two weeks ago following nationwide protests over the human rights violations of members of the public by its officers.

The Northern Governors' Forum (NGF) disagreed with the dissolution, noting that SARS was helping to fight the scourge of banditry across the northern region.

Matawalle said after an NGF meeting on Thursday, October 22, 2020 that SARS has contributed immensely to the peacebuilding in Zamfara, and should not be dissolved.

"We need the FSARS or its equivalent in Zamfara state because we have seen their positive impact in spite their alleged excesses," he said.

The IGP has already created the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) unit to fill the gaps left by SARS whose main role was tackling violent crimes especially armed robbery and kidnapping.

A total of 1,900 officers were dispatched to three camps earlier this week to commence three weeks of basic training.

As of the time of publishing this report, Matawalle was meeting with President Muhammadu Buhari in Abuja to discuss the recent bandits attacks in Zamfara.

At least 20 people were killed by gunmen in Tungar Kwana village, in Talata Mafara local government area of the state on Tuesday, October 20.