Former presidential candidate, Obadiah Mailafia, says he has no evidence for some of the controversial claims he made last month about insecurity in Nigeria.

He had claimed during a radio interview in August he got an intelligence report that a northern state governor is a commander of terrorist group, Boko Haram.

The former deputy governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) also claimed that Boko Haram was planning an invasion of the southern region in a bid to trigger a second civil war.

While addressing the media after a third interview with the Department of State Services (DSS) on Monday, September 14, 2020, Mailafia said he wished he had said a few things differently.

He said, "I spoke on the spur of the moments, and I believed that it was a matter of greater urgency to make a wake-up call to what is happening.

"I didn't really mean to say that the government was part and parcel of the killings.

"I implied that they could do better because thousands are dying, innocent women and children, elderly, and youths.

"But if I have my way I would have put it in better language, and I have no way of corroborating some of these things.

"I heard it and I couldn't have followed them into their camps to confirm because I might not come back to tell the story."

Mailafia has previously met with the DSS twice since he made his claims which attracted national attention.

Despite promising to continue to cooperate with authorities, he said he'd like to not receive another invitation over the same issue.

He also alleged that his life was being threatened even though he also said he has no conclusive proof.

"Where I was staying, on Thursday, I saw some strange people at the gate trying to break in. I jumped the fence and escaped because I don’t know who they are," he said.

When the Nigeria Police Force also invited him for questioning last month, Mailafia refused and filed a restraining order in court.

His claims prompted the National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) to fine Nigeria Info 99.3FM, the Lagos-based radio station that aired his interview, the sum of N5 million for unprofessional conduct.

The commission accused the radio station of providing a platform for the promotion of unverifiable and inciting views that could encourage or incite to crime, and lead to public disorder.