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Ramadan 5 things you need to know about the holy month

It is believed that during this holy month the gates of heaven are open and the devils are chained up.

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5 things you need to know about the holy month play

5 things you need to know about the holy month

(Greenwatch Dhaka)

Ramadan is one of the most important periods of the year for Muslims.

It is when the first verses of the Quran were revealed to the Prophet Muhammad on a night called Laylat al-Qadr, which today is spent by Muslims in prayer. It is believed that during this holy month the gates of heaven are open and the devils are chained up making it the most spiritually peaceful time for Muslims.

ALSO READ: Dates: the fruit of the holy month

play So many colourful activities take place to mark the end of Ramadan

 

While Ramadan is ongoing try visiting some Islamic countries and watch it come alive.

1. Iftar traditions vary

Iftar traditions vary between regions, countries and even different households. In some countries, iftar is hosted at a grandparent or uncles home while in others it is a small family affair that’s simply a delayed lunch. In some countries, iftar is a feast while in others it is a simple meal.

play Ramadan comes with conservative dressing (Mvslim)

 

2. Ramadan comes with conservative clothings

Ramadan is a month that changes lifestyles. A lot of Muslim women tend to wear more modest clothing during Ramadan, some even switch to wearing abayas and kaftans for the whole month.

3. There are different fasting hours around the world

During Ramadan Muslims fast from sunrise until sundown. But this varies across the world. For example, in Denmark, the fasting time may stretch as long as 21 hours and in some countries, it can be as low as 11 hours. However, Islam is a flexible religion which encourages comfort over resentment.

4. Food shops aren't sold during the day in the United Arab Emirates

During Ramadan food shops like Krispy Kreme will close until iftar time. This is prompted by the government’s request that non-Muslims respect those who are fasting. Restaurants, on the other hand, remain open but serve food behind screens which are then moved away when iftar comes round.

5. Not all those who fast are Muslims

Funny enough not all who fast during this period are Muslims.

How? With the rise in the publication of studies regarding the benefits of fasting, many non-Muslims are trying their hand at fasting. Others are trying to experience the month with their friends and enjoy the cultural aspects. There is nothing insensitive about trying out fasting if you’re not Muslim.

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