26 year old Lea Von Bidder is the founder and CEO of Ava, the first fertility-tracking wearable device. She was inspired to launch Ava because she is passionate about women’s empowerment.

Whether a woman is trying to get pregnant, or trying not to, the Ava bracelet is able to determine fertility with 89 percent accuracy. The medical technology company is focused on innovations in women’s reproductive and the Ava bracelet changes the game on current ovulation-tracking market. Ava gives you five fertile days, doubling your chances to conceive each month.

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“Only worn during the night, the Ava bracelet uses completely novel technology to detect the very beginning of a woman’s fertile window. Ava is registered with the FDA as a medical class one device and has proven to be 89% accurate to detect 5.3 fertile days in a woman’s menstrual cycle.”- Lea Von Bidder.

Ava’s bracelet sensors collect data throughout the night, and it detects in advance an average of at least five fertile days per cycle without the hassle of ovulation sticks and BBT thermometers. Users wear the Ava bracelet while sleeping and it syncs with the companion Ava app in the morning.

Lea Von Bidder further explained that “After a lifetime spent trying to avoid pregnancy, couples who begin trying to conceive often don’t realize how difficult it can be to get pregnant, for most women, there are only about six days per month where there is any possibility of conceiving, and only three days per month where it is likely. Even under the most favorable conditions a young, healthy couple having frequent unprotected intercourse, there is only about a 25 percent chance of getting pregnant in a given”

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Ava uses newly developed technology to monitor nine physiological parameters that are able detect the beginning of a woman’s fertile window. Ava’s sensors collect three million data points including breathing rate, sleep quality, pulse rate, heart rate variability, temperature and other parameters that correlate with the rise in reproductive hormones.

The San Francisco based company recently concluded clinical study at the University Hospital of Zurich where the Ava bracelet was proven to detect an average of 5.3 fertile days per cycle with 89 percent accuracy. The year-long study was conducted under Professor Brigitte Leeners, an expert on the mathematical modeling of menstrual cycles. Results from the clinical study will be published in a major medical journal later this year.

As for the future of Ava, Von Bidder hopes to continue to develop technology to help women throughout their lives.