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Manchester Attack How Nigerians can learn from the British

The way in which the British people have responded from the recent terror attack is something Nigerians should learn.

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Two grieving people in Manchester play

Two grieving people in Manchester

(Daily Sabah )

On May 22, 2017, there was a suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena in England which claimed the lives of at least 22 people.

The world has reacted to the sad news of the murder of children who wanted to listen to the music of Ariana Grande.

Leaders from around the world have sent in their condolence messages. The Queen of England has visited the victims and Barack Obama has spoken about the evil act.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II made a rare visit to see some of the wounded children, describing the attack as "very wicked" play

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II made a rare visit to see some of the wounded children, describing the attack as "very wicked"

(POOL/AFP)

 

The most heartwarming response has come from people in the United Kingdom. The people of Manchester and the UK have bonded during this time and have not allowed the attacks hold them back.

play

(AFP)

 

Minutes after the attack, people were helping the victims from the venue, cab men offered to take victims to the hospital for free and people opened their homes to parents who were looking for their kids.

There was a communal spirit that showed itself after the attack. The people of Manchester refused to allow a bunch of cowards make them run in fear.

Floral tributes, messages and candles are left in Manchester in tribute to the victims of Monday's attack at a concert venue in the city play

Floral tributes, messages and candles are left in Manchester in tribute to the victims of Monday's attack at a concert venue in the city

(AFP)

 

Minutes after the attack #PrayForManchester was everywhere. These people immediately got around to building their lives. Yesterday, Manchester United and Manchester City announced that it would be donating £1M to the emergency fund for victims.

People lay flowers in tribute to the victims of the May 22 bomb attack in Manchester in northern England play

People lay flowers in tribute to the victims of the May 22 bomb attack in Manchester in northern England

(AFP)

 

Within the last few years, Nigeria has had its share of acts of terrorism. Boko Haram has killed thousands of Nigerians. For the most part, our response as a people after a terrorist attack isn't hopeful.

Nigeria is a fragmented country where 'every man for himself' is the order of the day. When Boko Haram attacks the North East, Nigerians moan for a few seconds then move on with life. There is no collective grief, mourning and rebuilding. Life goes on. In the mind of an average Nigerian, as long as he is not dead all is right with the world.

Boko Haram's insurgency has left more than 2.6 million homeless and hungry play

Boko Haram's insurgency has left more than 2.6 million homeless and hungry

(AFP/File)

 

I find it odd that Nigerians complain that the international media doesn't focus on our plight when the Nigerian media doesn't even cover the basics.

We expect the international community to sympathise with us when there is a terrorist attack when we can't compassionately mourn our dead.

The suicide bombing at a pop concert in Manchester was the second terror attack in Britain in two months play

The suicide bombing at a pop concert in Manchester was the second terror attack in Britain in two months

(AFP)

 

The response of terrorist attacks in Paris and London have shown how people in advanced societies come together during a tragedy. In Nigeria, we can take a leaf from these places.

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