Muslims forced to flee for fear of being 'erased' by Christian rebels

More than 30,000 Muslims are living in seven enclaves, guarded by UN troops, across the country, but for those living outside, especially in rural areas, they are being targeted with impunity

The conflict in the CAR broke out when mainly Muslim Seleka rebels launched attacks in December

Christian militias have taken advantage of the political vacuum in Central African Republic (CAR), engaging in ethnic cleansing of Muslims in a bid to erase the religious community from the country, human rights group Amnesty International has said.

Discussing Friday's report, entitled "Erased identity: Muslims in ethnically cleansed areas of the Central African Republic," Joanne Mariner, a senior crisis response adviser at the UK-based organisation, told Al Jazeera that Muslims in the western half of the country were being repressed and forced to abandon their religion.

More than 30,000 Muslims are living in seven enclaves, guarded by UN troops, across the country, but for those living outside, especially in rural areas, they are being targeted with impunity, the report found.

"They not allowed to express themselves as Muslims; if they are outside the enclaves, they cannot pray, dress in any way that identifies them as Muslim," Mariner said.

"Their survival depends on a daily routine of negotiation with anti-Balaka fighters."

Mariner said that many had been forced convert to Christianity or face persecution from the community

More than one million people have been displaced since Muslim-led Seleka rebels took control of Bangui, the capital, in March 2013.

Following a spate of abuses by the Seleka rebels, vigilante groups known as anti-Balaka (anti-machete) emerged to fight off the new leadership.

But the anti-Balaka, made up of animist and Christian fighters, also targeted the country's Muslim minority, seen as sympathetic to the Seleka.

In April, a US envoy said that almost all of the 436 mosques in CAR have been destroyed in the violence. Samantha Power, US ambassador to the UN, called the devastation "kind of crazy, chilling".

Amnesty said in Friday's report that none of the mosques outside Bangui, and the town of Carnot, have been repaired or rebuilt.

One of the "clearest signs of the intensity of sectarian animus was the destruction of the country's mosques", the organisation said.

More than 6,000 people have been killed since the crisis began in March 2013.

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