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Pulse Blogger "Mission Impossible: fallout," a world of heroes and villains

Ethan wakes up into the darkness of a fusty room in Belfast. A self-destruct message relates itself: “Your mission, should you choose to accept it…”

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Mission : Impossible - Fallout play

(Entertainment.ie)

The compact story line, the back-to-back breath-taking action scenes, the cinematic grace of transitions between scenes.

Blockbusting features

The fast-paced sound track, the multiple choice locations, the adrenalin-pumping diction, the suspense, the optimal lighting are all testaments to the genius that goes into the making of the thrilling filmic output of “Mission Impossible: fallout.”

Dream motif

The opening scene piques your curiosity, making you wonder what the hell is going on as Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is seen on a seaside being joined with his ex-wife Julia (Michelle Monaghan) in what is popularly referred to as holy matrimony. Guess who the priest is. Solomon Lane, the villain of the previous Mission Impossible film.

As the priest dictates the love oath, Ethan notices there’s something wrong with the wording of the oath, it’s not exactly what it should be, so he is trying to make the priest stop it when he comes awake. Guess again. That’s a dream! And a flashback too!

Read Also: ‘Mission Impossible: Fall out,’ the most anticipated movie of the season

Fast-paced sound track, the multiple choice locations, the adrenalin-pumping diction play

Fast-paced sound track, the multiple choice locations, the adrenalin-pumping diction

(nukethefridge.com)

 

The use of dream motif helps wrap this movie in a more-than-physical aura. The wedding scene is repeatedly flashed across the scenes as the movie progresses, thereby reminding the audience of the significance of family life and importantly, love.

The message

Ethan wakes up into the darkness of a fusty room in Belfast. A self-destruct message relates itself: “Your mission, should you choose to accept it…” The message sends him on a deadly mission. He is to halt the destruction of the world and unleash lethal justice on the arms-dealing, terrorizing monsters of the world. At the door, there’s another messenger who begins the line “Fate whispers to the warrior, ‘storm is coming,’ and warrior whispers back, ‘I am the storm.’”

That last part is delivered by Ethan Hunt himself. This poetic introduction into the strength and fate of Ethan, is a corroborative attempt at intimating the audience on the life Ethan Hunt is born to live. His fate is to go through terrifying ordeal just to keep the world safe.  Platonium has fallen into the hands of terrorists and they are ready to blow up the world with it.

The battle for plutonium

Ethan Hunt and CIA rep, August Walker have to constantly act under the guise of being in sync with a group of terrorists just so they can snatch the plutonium away from the grips of the atrocious guys. Thus, they keep attacking and outwitting each other in order to eventually achieve their goal. This culminates in scary rhythms of breath-breaking stunts through Paris, Belfast, London and Berlin.

Apocalyptic voice

The scenes are as memorable as shocking as they come. The scenes that end in Ethan’s captivation of Solomon Lane would certainly leave you clinging to the armrest. Even after that arrest, the words that emerge from the mouth of this soulless terrorist would make you want to kill him instantly.

He cannot help but sound apocalyptic, “Your mission, should you choose to accept it. I wonder, did you ever choose not to? The end you’ve always feared is coming. And the blood will be on your hands. The fallout of all your good intentions.”

Throughout the movie, Solomon Lane’s voice is an omen heralding the most unfortunate calamities. His voice comes with such distinctiveness befitting a ruthless antihero. His unkempt face adds epic malfeasance to the evils he perpetrates.

Read Also: “Mission Impossible: Fall out” wows the audience

The greater the suffering the greater the peace. play

The greater the suffering the greater the peace.

(Comic Book)

 

Lane and his philosophy of war and peace

His philosophy of peace and war is so crazily frankensteined in such a way that you are not likely to grab the core of it at the first instance unless you take a pause and ruminate over it. “There cannot be peace without first, a great suffering. The greater the suffering the greater the peace.”

It is ironic that a terrorist preaches peace and understands that the true depth of peace cannot be reached until humanity has gone through the stark opposite of it. His assertion is true, for we only appreciate life because of the presence of death.

But Solomon Lane is not the only enemy, there are many other groups and horrible individuals who have vested interest in the affairs of plutonium and arms dealing. John Lark remains faceless throughout the movie as the Apostles carry out grave attacks on major cities of the world.

August Walker who happens to be a representative of the CIA turns out to be an accomplice of Solomon Lane. In fact, he is the direct enemy that Secrete Agent, Ethan Hunt faces in the last fifteen minutes as he (Ethan) and his team fight tooth and nail to avert the calamity that is fast descending on the world.

Written by Omidire Idowu

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