• On Sunday, March 10, 2019, at about 8:44 am local time, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board.
  • Investigations to what exactly brought the Boeing's 737 MAX 8 model tumbling down just six minutes after takeoff are ongoing but it is suspected Boeing’s new anti-installing system (MCAS) fitted on the plane might have been the reason behind the accident.
  • In a tweet seen by Business Insider SSA shared online capturing an email sent to the airline, a customer tried to warn Ethiopian Airline on the new anti-installing system (MCAS).

On Sunday, March 10, 2019, at about 8:44 am local time, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board; 149 passengers and 8 crew members.

Investigations to what exactly brought the Boeing's 737 MAX 8 model tumbling down just six minutes after takeoff are ongoing but it is suspected Boeing’s new anti-installing system (MCAS) fitted on the plane might have been the reason behind the accident.

Remnants of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 which crashed shortly after take-off on Sunday.

Preliminary observations indicate that there are similarities between Ethiopian Airlines’s Sunday crash with the October 2018 crash of Lion Air Flight 610 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Both crashes involved the 737 MAX 8 and just like Ethiopia’s Flight 302, the Lion Air flight crashed shortly after takeoff killing all 189 passengers and crew.

A preliminary report on the Lion Air crash found that a sensor and its related software sent the plane into a nosedive.

A coast guard ship is seen at the site where Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed into the sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province

Following the accident, which comes barely five months after the same model of Boeing crashed off the coast of Indonesia, countries across the globe went on a panic mode and grounded all Boeing 737 Max 8 in operation, causing Boeing’s shares to fell more than 12 per cent in early trading on Monday.

As at Monday morning, 4 countries had all grounded and suspended the use of Boeing 737 Max 8 jets across the world. They are Ethiopian Airlines, China, the United States and the Cayman Islands.

Also read: Just like the proverbial phoenix, Ethiopian Airlines will rise again after Sunday’s Flight 302 crash that killed all 157 people on board

Foto: GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP As at Monday morning, 4 countries had all grounded and suspended the use of Boeing 737 Max 8 jets across the world.

All the four countries have one fear concerning the world's largest airliner developers and manufacturers - Boeing’s new anti-installing system (MCAS) which has a tendency to malfunction.

And that is exactly what had one concerned customer worried and tried to unsuccessfully warn the Ethiopian Airlines.

A member of the ground crew directs an Ethiopian Airlines plane at the Bole International Airport in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, August 21, 2015. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri

In a tweet seen by Business Insider SSA shared online capturing an email sent to the airline, a customer expresses concern on the new anti-installing system (MCAS) which is causing headaches across the aviation industry.

Hello, I’m an aviation enthusiast and a customer of yours. I do therefore a lot of research on aviation and stay up to date with aviation related news, and I’ve noticed that Ethiopian airlines ordered and started to receive 737 max.” Part of the email read.

The concerned customer head was spinning on why Ethiopian Airlines, Africa’s most profitable and successful airline, had ordered the Boeing 737 max model despite the warnings and fears on its safety.

“I’m sending this email to make sure that Ethiopian airlines and their B737 max pilots are aware of the situation regarding the anti-stalling system (MCAS) on this particular aircraft” the concerned customer went on.

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Ethiopian Airlines, which currently has five Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet, received the ill-fated Boeing 737 MAX 8 last year.

The customer even went ahead and provided links of reports of airlines including American airlines which had raised alarm about the MCAS.

“I took the time to write this email because this is about safety and I strongly believe that safety should be the first priority of everyone in the airline industry. I’m looking forward to hearing from you,” part of the email read.

File image of an Ethiopian Airline Boeing 737-700.

Despite sending the email two months ago regarding the 737 max, the concerned customer claims he never received a response from Ethiopian airlines.