• "Living in bondage: Breaking free" is a 2019 Nollywood remake of the popular 1992 film
  • Released on November 8th, the remake is currently the number one movie in Nigeria as of this writing on November 22nd, with a cumulative box office take of N75.3 million
  • The movie's plot is a father/son continuum that see's the offspring in 2019 facing the same challenges his father did in 1992
  • What do you do when you discover the wealth bestowed upon you by a generous mentor comes at the cost of the life of someone dear to you?
  • The film's plot shines a spotlight on the occult and raises the question of how exactly these sinister outfits make money

The Economics of the occult is a mystery

This man is sacrificing suya to the god of your purse or wallet
This man is sacrificing suya to the god of your purse or wallet

To explore the money making mystery in this film, we illustrate with a real-world transaction. Grilled meat in various forms is a worldwide delicacy. Known as Suya in West Africa, the value is in the taste. In order to experience the taste, you have to pay for it. If you will, the seller of the Suya is sacrificing the grilled beef/chicken/ram meat to you for a price, usually N100 to N250 or more for a rolled pack in newspapers depending on where you but it. Simple, straightforward transaction which applies to virtually everything with value that can be measured in units of currency.

So who pays the Occult for their sacrifices?

A sacrificial scene from the Living in Bondage remake
A sacrificial scene from the Living in Bondage remake

Keeping the Suya example in mind, let's switch to the business model of the Occult. In the movie, actor Ramsey Nouah (who made his Directorial debut with this film) is a wealthy business man by day, and leader of a sinister occult (made up entirely of men) named "The six" by night. Membership of the six requires giving up the life of a loved one in exchange for wealth. So here we have the same scenario with the Suya but here lies the critical question; who pays the occult for the souls they sacrifice?

Does the money for souls appear from thin air?

Living in Bondage seems to feature magic money tricks
Living in Bondage seems to feature magic money tricks

Buying Suya in 5 steps

  1. Reach into your pocket
  2. Pull out money
  3. Hand the money over to the Suya seller
  4. Receive Suya in exchange
  5. Enjoy your Suya while the seller enjoys your money

Ramsey Nouah sacrificing a life for money in his movie in 5 steps

  1. Offer sacrifice to.......unknown
  2. Unknown receives body/soul in an unknown chamber
  3. Unknown pulls money out of.......somewhere.....
  4. Money from mysterious source is given to Ramsey Nouah's character
  5. He buys a Porsche and Private Jet to entice more people to get hooked on his monetary gifts so he can get more sacrifices

This goes beyond a fictional movie, people believe profitable Occults are real

Millions (possibly billions) of earthlings around the globe believe lives can be exchanged for money. Looking at the Slavery model, humans were sold in exchange for money but it was based on manual labor. The money paid for a slave was done in anticipation of the output of their manual labor yielding returns. The Spirit world of the occult seems to work differently.

Closing questions

  • Why do spirits pay physical money for souls?
  • Why don't spirits give something spiritual in exchange for the souls they receive?
  • Where do the spirits get their money and where do they keep it?
  • How much does one soul cost and has it kept up with inflation and the Naira/Dollar exchange rate?