Sanitary Care Toxic shock syndrome inspire bill for tampon transparency

Robin Danielson died nearly nearly 20 years ago from Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS), the rare-but-scary side effect of using a tampon that has terrified girls for years.

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Personally, i have always had a problem with inserting so called sanitary towels of any sort into my body and this further solidifies my stand, but it just might make you feel safer.

Robin Danielson died nearly nearly 20 years ago from Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS), the rare-but-scary side effect of using a tampon that has terrified girls for years.

In her honor and name, legislation to better regulate the feminine hygiene industry was proposed that same year to protect women from TSS and other health problems.

It had been earlier rejected in 1998 and eight more times since then, but the Robin Danielson bill is now up for debate in Congress again.

For something that we use on a monthly basis, tampons and pads aren't something most of us put much thought into.

This fact has allowed manufacturers to have a similarly blasé attitude, says Representative Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), who has reintroduced the Robin Danielson bill for the tenth time.

"We need more dedicated and substantial research to address unanswered health concerns regarding the safety of feminine hygiene products," Maloney told RH Reality Check, referring not just to killer bacterial infections like Toxic Shock Syndrome but also to smaller risks like the chemicals used to bleach the cotton in tampons or possible carcinogens in fragrances.

"American women spend well over $2 billion per year on feminine hygiene products, and the average woman will use over 16,800 tampons and pads over the course of her lifetime".

Despite this large investment and high usage, there has been limited research on the potential health risks these products may pose to women."

Part of the lack of data may be because tampons and other feminine hygiene products are considered personal medical devices and therefore aren't subject to FDA testing and oversight.

Currently, manufacturers aren't required to list the ingredients, processes, or chemicals used, nor do they have to make internal testing reports public.

The brand new Robin Danielson Bill would require companies to disclose ingredients and would mandate independent testing of all feminine hygiene products with all reports being publicly available.

Maloney is hoping that the passage of the bill will force companies to be more transparent and give women answers about what exactly it is we're putting up our most sensitive areas.

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