Pulse Health Tips 10 things you should know about the new malaria vaccine

The vaccine, Mosquirix, has been 30 years in the making and was developed by pharmaceutical giant,  GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Published:
play (Alamy/Telegraph)
24/7 Live - Subscribe to the Pulse Newsletter!

Earlier on, news broke about the all-new malaria vaccine which has been approved for use in Africa.

The vaccine, Mosquirix, has been 30 years in the making and was developed by pharmaceutical giant,  GlaxoSmithKline.

The European Medicines Agency gave a positive scientific opinion after assessing the vaccine's safety and effectiveness, and in October, the Word Health Organisation will decide whether it should be deployed.

Here are 10 things you should know about the new malaria vaccine.

 

  1. play (BBC)

    The vaccine, Mosquirix, otherwise known as the RTS,S vaccine, is the first against a parasitic infection in humans.

  2. Mosquirix has been designed specifically to combat malaria infection in children in Africa and will not be licensed for travellers.

  3. The vaccine was developed by British pharmaceutical giant, GlaxoSmithKline and while they have not revealed the price of the vaccine, they've pledged not to make a profit from it.

  4. GSK began research on a malaria vaccine 30 years ago and the first trials in Africa began in 1998.

  5. In 2001 a partnership was established between GSK and the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with the aim of accelerating development of malaria vaccines.

  6. During the clinical trials of the vaccine, the best protection was among children aged 5 to 17 months who received three doses of the vaccine a month apart, plus a booster dose at 20 months.

  7. The vaccine was also found not to be effective in protecting young babies from severe malaria, a situation which will see the WHO decide in October whether the vaccine should be deployed.

  8. According to trial results, children will need to receive all four doses of the vaccine in order to benefit.

  9. The vaccine works by triggering the immune system to defend against the first stages of infection by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite after it enters the bloodstream following a mosquito bite.

  10. While scientists have applauded the development of the vaccine as significant, they have pointed out that more work still needs to be done on it, with Prof Adrian Hill of the Jenner Institute, Oxford stating that a mosquito net is still more effective in the fight against malaria than a vaccine.

 

Do you ever witness news or have a story that should be featured on Pulse Nigeria?
Submit your stories, pictures and videos to us now via WhatsApp: +2349055172167, Social Media @pulsenigeria247: #PulseEyewitness & DM or Email: eyewitness@pulse.ng. More information here.