Pulse Album Review Brymo's "Klitoris" is one deep pillow talk and more

“Klitoris” has Brymo sticking largely to a formula that has yielded dividends with each new application. The singer’s play on vivid emotional imagery buoyed by seamless, instrumentation from the mastery of Mikkyme Joses is still peerless in Nigerian mainstream.

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Brymo's Klitoris album artwork play

Brymo's "Klitoris" album artwork

(Press)
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Album – “Klitoris”

Artiste – BrymO

Producer – Mikkyme Joses

Duration – 35 Minutes

Brymo is a man of exquisite imagery, and he hit Nigeria smack with this. “Klitoris” dropped right at the centre of a (publicly) conservative Nigeria media with enough uproar to create a new energy source. His third album since he made the move from Chocolate City, Brymo continues to play conceptual theories, creating imagery via the deft use of sound, lyrics and vacant spaces.

From the scattered-mirror approach of a man who journeyed to Lagos in pursuit of the Nigerian dream ("Merchants, Dealers & Slaves"), to the rippling-puddle approach to love, nostalgia, and sage-worthy introspection which reins in “Tabula Rasa”. This time he goes for something he has played with in all albums, and the most simplistic of all his subjects – love.

Brymo play

Brymo

(Brymo)

 

“Klitoris” has the singer dedicating the entire work to a woman. The title which is generally known as the most sensitive part of female genitalia, has etymological origins which can  be translated as ‘key’ in Greek. That’s the entrance to heightened feminine pleasure, and the singer makes his way through that door in creating this album.

The dripping ‘Naked’ opens up this album, as Brymo reveals himself up to the power of that emotion. Introspection meets romance, “And it will be worth it, your love I don’t deserve it, take all I have please, love me, leave me naked’. His lavish single ‘Happy memories’, paradoxically paints a sad picture of man who yearns for his rich past of love and joyous moments. But it evades him in the present. The past is past for that love. There’s poetic reverie in the percussion heavy ‘Kosayami’, and ‘Let’s make love’ goes very direct while creating premises of depth. ‘Mirage’ is one long post-coital pillow-talk, laden with emotional bliss and promises.

Brymo play

Brymo

 

It's not all love and emotional reflections, as the rattling ‘Them dey go’ is an allegory for the current heated and fragile Nigerian state. Plagued by the ills of governance, personal greed and value erosion, Brymo blurts out ‘I tell them if them no wan gree, make them scatter’. ‘The way the cookie crumbles’ explores sonic experimentation, fusing Reggae with piercing Electro. It morphs into the final vacant track ‘Girl from New York’. The Afrobeat dance-fest, ‘Alajo Shomolu’, which is cheeky as well as humorous, playing on the tribal folklore of the character Alajo Shomolu, who intelligently sold his car for a bicycle. A breath of white hope comes through in the EDM-twisted ‘Something good is happening’. That upbeat vibe gets consolidated in ‘Billion Dollar dream’.

Klitoris” has Brymo sticking largely to a formula that has yielded dividends with each new application. The singer’s play on vivid emotional imagery buoyed by seamless, instrumentation from the mastery of Mikkyme Joses is still peerless in Nigerian mainstream music.

Rating: 4.5/5

Ratings

1-Dull

2-Boring

2.5-Average

3-Worth Checking Out

3.5-Hot

4-Smoking Hot

4.5-Amazing

5-Perfection

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